Category Archives: ISTE coaching standard 2

Google Forms and the Power of Self-Assessment

Mention the word ‘data’ in a staff meeting and you’ll see teachers stifle eye rolls and sighs. Because we know what’s coming next…graphs and charts depicting test scores from the prior school year or quarter showing us all the ways in which our students didn’t meet the districts’ lofty goals. This isn’t the kind of data I want to talk about today. I want to talk about data that is meaningful and student-driven.

Data collection and analysis is part of the ISTE Coaching Standard 2h, “…model effective use of technology tools and resources to systematically collect and analyze student achievement data.” Being a self-professed Google junkie, I knew I wanted to cover Google Forms for this post. Then, after researching the many ways Google Forms can be used for data collection, I discovered a post on the blog Lindsay Ann Learning which suggested using Forms for student self-assessment. I’ve used Forms to gather and analyze multiple choice data, but this post opened my eyes to new ways to use Forms for data. It also challenged me to consider how I define “quality” data. Is it the percentage of students who chose the correct letter answer, or is it growth over time as defined by a much broader set of standards and demonstrated through reflection?

What is meaningful self-assessment?

  • A process in which students “1) monitor and evaluate the quality of their thinking and behavior when learning and 2) identify strategies that improve their understanding and skills. That is, self-assessment occurs when students judge their own work to improve performance as they identify discrepancies between current and desired performance.” (McMillan & Hearn, 2008)

Why student-driven data?

  • Students regularly provided with the opportunity to self-assess and reflect on their own learning are more likely to recognize the elements that led to success: hard work, effort, and studying. (Fernandes & Fontana, 1996)

New Data Idea 1: Collect data in the form of student reflection

To test out this new way of collecting data, I made a sample Research Project Self-Assessment in Google Forms. I incorporated the advice shared on Lindsay Ann Learning including using linear scales with an odd number of choices (to ensure no middle-line stances), incorporating open and close-ended questions, and writing questions designed to measure self-perception of learning. Here’s what data from that self-assessment might look like:

Class-wide data as seen from Google Form Responses tab

 

Sample student report with change over time (click to enlarge)

 

New Data Idea 2: Give the power of the rubric to students

Rubrics. I have a love-hate relationship with them. Why? They’re so helpful in understanding where a student is at and why, yet almost no student actually reads through them! That’s why I appreciated Jennifer Roberts’ idea. As part of her Memoir Self-Reflection (which you can make a copy of here), students must read through her rubric and rate themselves on each element.

Photo credit: Google Form ‘Memoir Self Evaluation’ made by Jennifer Roberts

Research supports the value of rubrics in helping students meet learning goals. As stated by McMillan and Hearn: “[P]roviding evaluation criteria through rubrics…helps students concretely understand outcomes and expectations. They then begin to understand and internalize the steps necessary to meet the goals.” (2008)

New Data Idea 3: Exit tickets for quick reflection

Exit tickets as formative assessment are nothing new in education. However, using Google Forms to streamline this process can help you easily gauge how students feel about their own learning after a lesson. Here’s a sample Exit Ticket I made. Taking a minute at the end of class to allow students to self-assess can inform instruction before you dive into assessments and projects with a large portion of your class potentially in the dark.

 

 

Next Steps

Self-assessment data should drive instruction in your class in the same way that traditional high-stakes testing instruction should. Below are some next-steps you might consider when using self-assessment data to drive instruction.

 

Sources

Fernandes, M., & Fontana, D. (1996). Changes in control beliefs in Portuguese primary school pupils as a consequence of the employment of self-assessment strategies. British Journal Of Educational Psychology, 66(3), 301-313. doi: 10.1111/j.2044-8279.1996.tb01199.x

Google Forms for Data Collection. (2016). Retrieved from https://lindsayannlearning.com/student-data-google-forms/

McMillan, J., & Hearn, J. (2008). Student Self-Assessment: The Key to Stronger Student Motivation and Higher Achievement. Educational Horizons, 40. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ815370.pdf

Roberts, J. (2017). Self-Evaluation Google Form for Students. Retrieved from http://www.litandtech.com/2017/09/self-evaluation-google-form-for-students.html

Effective Communication & Questioning When Coaching

Coaches motivate, inspire, and encourage their players by asking questions, dispensing advice, encouraging do-overs and repeating skills to achieve excellence, and providing opportunities for growth. How do coaches learn and perfect their own coaching techniques? How do they know the questions to ask and how do they practice their skills? As a peer technology coach, studying the […]

EDTC 6105: ISTE Coaching Standards 2f: Visionary Leadership & 6 b&c: Content Knowledge and Professional Growth

ISTE Coaching Standard 2 provides eight benchmarks for technology coaches to assist teachers in using technology effectively for assessing student learning, differentiating instruction, and providing rigorous, relevant and engaging learning experiences for all students. My focus is on benchmark f: Coach teachers in and model incorporation of research-based best practices in instructional

Building a School Culture That Supports Teacher Leadership

As we begin to wrap up our final inquiries of the quarter, our cohort examines the essential question of what we think will be essential to support and sustain success as a coach. This felt very relevant to me. After this quarter and the hands on work we have done during our peer coaching work, I have naturally been reflecting on what my coaching role will look like in the near future. I understand what the traditional coaching role can look like when it is held as a specific title and role, but I don’t see myself leaving the classroom in the near future. With the essential question in mind, I wanted to explore how I can continue to grow as a coach while remaining in a classroom teacher role.

ISTE Standards addressed:

ISTE-C Standard 2: Teaching, Learning, and Assessment

f. Coach teachers in and model incorporation of research-based best practices in instructional design when planning technology-enhanced learning experiences

Standard 6: Content Knowledge and Professional Growth

b.Engage in continuous learning to deepen professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions in organizational change and leadership, project management, and adult learning to improve professional practice

c. Regularly evaluate and reflect on their professional practice and dispositions to improve and strengthen their ability to effectively model and facilitate technology-enhanced learning experiences.

click on the image above to see the full pamphlet

While searching for resources, I came across an amazing pamphlet designed by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. It presents important information about building a school culture that supports teacher leadership. The pamphlet highlights important characteristics of a supportive school culture and informs teachers and school leaders about guiding questions and strategies that can help guide them. From the pamphlet, I have dissected the information that stood out the most to me.

All of these characteristics are equally important when building a supportive school culture around teacher leadership. The same characteristics become even more important when you fall into a teacher leadership or coaching role.  Just in my limited beginning coaching work, I strongly identify with the importance of building trust and establishing clear communication. It would be hard to complete successful working without first building these two important foundations. It is important that the entire school culture reflects these characteristics as well. The pamphlet asks the reader to pose these questions: Do you see these characteristics in your school? How do you know they are there? Are there other things you would add to this list? I found these questions really helped framed my mindset as I continue to compare the information to my role and what I currently see in my school.

I appreciate that this resource listed ways that an administrator can contribute positively to a supportive culture of teacher leadership. All of the above recommendations are important to set the tone for teachers. I particularly related to being approachable and flexible. I have worked with administrators that have been both. My mindset, growth and general well being flourished so much more when I felt that I could honestly approach and interact with my admin. Personally, when I am more comfortable in that respect taking new risks and initiative within my teaching feels more natural and supported.

Throughout this quarter, we have explored many of the points listed above. Risk taking, setting attainable goals and not being afraid to fail have been common themes that reoccured when we were doing our coaching work. I can identify most with the idea of taking small steps. It can be all too easy for someone to want to try everything all at once, but setting small goals and taking the steps to achieve them is more realistic and prevents feeling overwhelmed and burned out.

Overall, this resource has really helped me obtain a mindset that will help me evaluate and develop a strong school culture of teacher leadership at my school. Contributing to this culture can help me establish a stronger leadership role, while still remaining in the classroom.

Resources:

Building a School Culture That Supports Teacher Leadership. (2015, April). Retrieved December 11, 2016, from http://www.doe.mass.edu/edeval/leadership/BuildingSchoolCulture.pdf

EDTC 6105: ISTE Coaching Standards 1d: Visionary Leadership, 2f: Teaching Learning & Assessment – Learning to Know vs. Learning To Be

ISTE Coaching Standard 1 provides four benchmarks for technology coaches to inspire and participate in the development and implementation of a shared vision for the comprehensive integration of technology to promote excellence and support transformational change throughout the instructional environment. My focus is on benchmark d: Implement strategies for initiating and sustaining technology

Connecting Curriculum with 21st Century Learning Standards

We often hear instructional technology leaders and educators say that it’s not about the technology, it’s about the learning. So should be said for the curriculum. Les Foltos said that technology integration is not something separate from content and pedagogy and is only effective when it supports and enhances 21st-century pedagogy and content. This week’s […]

Students as Contributors Adding Value to our Communities

Many years ago, I worked in a school where student learning involved solving real-world problems. One example is when third graders interviewed city transportation officials as well as school district operations managers, parents, and staff to design a new parking lot and traffic pattern for the congested unsafe lot. They used math to design model […]

Back to the Basics

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retrieved from blog.kathyschrock.net

The above photo was shared to me by my peer Kaity Fain. As I was looking for ways to introduce SAMR and TPACK, I thought this metaphor of SAMR was cute and relatable.

This past week our cohort explored what skills, resources and processes we could utilize as we begin to co plan learning activities our learning partners want to improve on. 

This covers the following ISTE Standards:

ISTE-C Standard 1: Visionary Leadership

d.Implement strategies for initiating and sustaining technology innovations and manage the change process in schools and classrooms

ISTE-C Standard 2: Teaching, Learning, and Assessment

f. Coach teachers in and model incorporation of research-based best practices in instructional design when planning technology-enhanced learning experiences

I noticed a common theme in the resources we read this week. The readings really emphasized the importance of a learning and standards outcome focus as opposed to solely technology focused. This has been an important recurring focus throughout this entire quarter, as it should be. In our reading, “Peer Coaching: Unlocking the Power of Collaboration,” it’s mentioned that:

Too often, teachers still plan their lessons around technology instead of putting learning first. What these teachers need to make the connection is a collaborative partner, a coach, who will help them focus first on learning and then chose the technology that will help students reach the learning goals (Foltos 2013).

With our essential question in mind, I began to explore what skills I could help my learning partner develop to ensure that learning activities remained objective focused as opposed to technology focused. I’ve noticed as I began to adopt a coaching role, that it is easy for technology to be the sole focus of objectives, goals and learning activities. Throughout the corner I have seen many great resources that have taught me how to put learning as the first and most important focus, but I needed a way to portray this to my learning partner.

Through role playing and real life exercises with each other, our cohort has been exploring and utilizing a learning activities checklist from Les Foltos’ book “Peer Coaching: Unlocking the Power of Collaboration.” I find this a powerful resource that really helps you evaluate a learning activity in every aspect. However, I do think if it is new to someone, it can be slightly intimidating.

Back to the Basics

During the week, I tried to reflect on what resources helped me a lot in the beginning of the DEL program. I remember feeling slightly overwhelmed with all of the ideas and concepts I was being introduced to. I felt grateful for the resources that presented these concepts to me in an easy, clear way. The TPACK and SAMR models, were two resources that really felt applicable to everything we were exploring. Once they were presented to me in a way that was clear, I began to understand our learning in a more complete way.

I decided I will introduce my learning partner to the TPACK and SAMR models before we start to utilize the learning activity checklist in our planning. I think a clear understanding of the framework of content and technology will make the learning activity checklist more applicable and useful. Below are two videos made by Common Sense Media that provide an introduction to the TPACK and SAMR models:


retrieved from youtube.com

retrieved from youtube.com

Resources:

Foltos, L. (2013). Peer coaching: Unlocking the power of collaboration.

Introduction to the TPACK Model. (n.d.). Retrieved November 27, 2016, from https://www.commonsensemedia.org/videos/introduction-to-the-tpack-model

Introduction to the SAMR Model. (n.d.). Retrieved November 26, 2016, from https://www.commonsensemedia.org/videos/introduction-to-the-samr-model

EDTC 6105: ISTE Coaching Standards 1d: Visionary Leadership, 2f: Teaching Learning & Assessment & 6: Content Knowledge and Professional Growth

ISTE Coaching Standard 1 provides four benchmarks for technology coaches to inspire and participate in the development and implementation of a shared vision for the comprehensive integration of technology to promote excellence and support transformational change throughout the instructional environment. My focus is on benchmark d: Implement strategies for initiating and sustaining technology

EDTC 6105 | Module 2 Resolution

Module 2 Exploration: How can I successfully build peer to peer learning experiences with faculty, including peer coaching opportunities, in a higher education setting?

ISTE-C Standard 1: Visionary Leadership
d. Implement strategies for initiating and sustaining technology innovations and manage the change process in schools and classrooms
ISTE-C Standard 2: Teaching, Learning, and Assessment
f. Coach teachers in and model incorporation of research-based best practices in instructional design when planning technology-enhanced learning experiences

This scene from The Big Bang Theory (with bonus subtitles) accurately depicts a conversation where both participants aren’t feeling listened to; in fact, they are speaking about completely different topics within a the same conversation and both want empathy and understanding from one another, though they aren’t willing to give empathy and understanding themselves. Although Leonard tried to establish a norm of listening and responding, the lack of empathy, inquiry, and equal contribution to the conversation made it impossible for the conversation to go anywhere and ultimately left both Sheldon and Leonard frustrated.

Like many relationships and partnerships, successful communication between a group is not possible without established trust and respect. In fact, I was recently reminded by the article Ahhhh! Emotions in My Classroom” that practicing communication and collaboration skills is not merely for adult peer relationships, but is something we can consistently practice and model for our students. Like building trust and respect among students in a classroom, a rapport needs to be built between members of a Professional Learning Network before successful communication and collaboration can happen. This rapport can come from an intentional commitment to norms that are created prior to working together (Foltos, 2011). Some commonly established norms that help increase trust and respect are:

  • Avoid side conversations
  • Say on agenda
  • Self-regulate
  • Listen respectfully
  • Discuss issues, not people,
  • Assume positive intentions (Meyer et al., 2011r)

While establishing a set of norms prior to working together can establish trust and respect for a group, rapport can also be built more informally and often leads to further opportunities for professional growth. In Everyday Conversations as a Context for Professional Learning and Development, Niel Haigh highlights how conversations between colleagues, where a rapport has already been established often lead to the kind of relationship and professional development  peer coaches desire. A balance of inquiry and advocacy makes a conversation successful, “where people expose their own thinking effectively and make that thinking open to the influence of others” (Senge, 1990, p. 9). Haigh focuses on the prerequisite of “conversation” before “discussion,” which I felt echoed the communication skills highlighted in chapter 5 of Peer Coaching, where trust and respect, as well as communication and collaboration norms preceded any discussion or plan to move forward with an idea.

There are four  key communications skills that are norms of collaboration, as introduced by Les Foltos in Peer Coaching:

  • Active Listening: body language, block out competitive thoughts, let the speaker fully finish
  • Paraphrasing: designed to focus on the speaker, don’t include the pronoun I
  • Clarifying Questions: simple and factual, designed to get full picture
  • Probing Questions: start with a paraphrase, encourage learner to dig deeper, increase ownership

The main takeaway is that even if the responder/peer coach has the answer, the coach is asked to erase that answer from his or her mind and focus on helping the learner “…formulate their strategies. It is ultimately their answer” (Grace Dublin, p. 85). Ann Hayes-Bell shared some excellent resources for peer coaches from the School Reform Initiative of probing question sentence starters that put the learner’s need at the center. ISTE-C Standard 2 outlines a coach’s responsibility to “coach teachers in and model incorporation of research-based best practices in instructional design when planning technology-enhanced learning experiences.” This is wholly impossible without creating a learning environment of trust, collaboration, and respect. Ultimately, it’s impossible to implement technology innovations within schools and classrooms if a relationship of trust, respect, and collaboration is not created between a peer coach and a learning partner.


Resources:

(2012, November 16). Bad Listeners. Retrieved October 19, 2016, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6TeOGJP5vGA

Eynon-Lynch, M., & Gehlsen, M. (2016, October 12). Ahhhh! Emotions in My Classroom. Retrieved October 19, 2016, from https://medium.com/pear-deck/ahhhh-emotions-in-my-classroom-8c70487b5b3e#.4gnr63aag

Foltos, L. (2013). Peer coaching: Unlocking the power of collaboration. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.

Neil Haigh (2005): Everyday conversation as a context for professional learning and development, International Journal for Academic Development, 10:1, 3-16

Senge, P. (1994). The fifth discipline fieldbook: strategies and tools for building a learning organization. London: Nicholas Brealey Publishing