Category Archives: ISTE coaching standard 4

EDTC 6106 – 5 Components of Professional Development with Techology

During the final week of this quarter, we are summing up what are the main aspects of professional development utilizing technology.  Coaching Standard 4: Professional Development and Program Evaluation: Design, develop and implement technology rich professional learning programs that model principles of adult learning and promote digital age best practices in teaching, learning, and assessment. (ISTE, 2014)

  • Triggering Event Initial Question: What does the ideal technology-rich learning program look like?
  • My Triggering Question: What are top five specific areas that will contribute to a rich professional learning program?

Throughout the last few weeks, we have been delving into different aspects of professional development and educational technology and I’ve come to learn a lot of about what is essential in creating effective ones.  The following are five areas that I believe are important in accomplishing that goal.

Set a Vision with Stakeholders

From the conclusion page from the Office of Educational Technology it states:

“Set a vision for the use of technology to enable learning such that leaders bring all stakeholder groups to the table, including students, educators, families, technology professionals, community groups, cultural institutions, and other interested parties”. (Office of Educational Technology, 2017)

Just this last weekend I was involved in a technology vision summit for my school district where we did just what the above quote is talking about.  Teachers, administrators, parents, students, business partner, and community groups all came together for a six hour period and we created “A Day in the Life” sketches of how students would be utilizing technology.  It was an incredibly rewarding and eye-opening experience witnessing this diverse group of people coming together to create a shared vision of technology for our students.

I believe that effective professional development first starts at a district level where all stakeholders are given a voice to what they wish to see in schools and from there a plan can be put into place in schools.  This will help to increase buy-in from all parties and will enable continued support from teachers, parents, schools, etc.

Establish Learning Goals and Select Technology Around That

Calcasieu Parish Public Schools have learned that one way of creating effective professional development is to only select technology that supports their learning goals instead of the other way around.  By selecting technology around goals schools will be able to increase student achievement and a clear plan can be put into place.  The alternative is to pick technology and force the curriculum into it which may or may not support the building goals. (Hunter, 2016)

Provide Continued Training and Support

“Rowan-Salisbury relies heavily on “job-embedded” professional development delivered by instructional technology specialists in each school, who provide training and support specifically tailored to the needs of individual teachers…”  (Hunter, 2016)

Another school district, Rowan-Salisbury in North Carolina talks about how creating job-embedded professional development can support teachers.  They advocate providing professional development during the school day as well as providing continuing support for technology that is implemented.

In my experience talking with teachers, they feel that new technology is introduced but there is often little to no follow-up and they don’t feel supported enough to keep using it or would like to take it further.  Continued training seems to be a key aspect for them to be more effective in their teaching practices.

Provide Assessments

Without assessments, it’s hard to determine if progress is being made.  The Office of Educational Technology states that an integrated assessment system should be put in place to provide data and feedback to stakeholders in a way that is timely and actionable.  With this data, schools can make decisions about whether student growth is happening and can change professional development accordingly.  A mobile-first mindset for this is emphasized so that feedback can be widely accessible.  (Office of Educational Technology, 2017)

Create Strong and Trusting Relationships

An evaluative report named Transforming Professional Learning in Washington State, listed “Strong and trusting relationships among professionals provide for collaborative systems” as one of the recommendations for future practices (Bishop, 2016).  Although this could be applied to any type of professional development, I feel that creating trusting relationships is sometimes overlooked and if we want teachers to collaborate with each other to deepen their learning, then fostering a positive environment is essential.

Conclusion

Although there are many more important aspects of an effective technology-rich professional development session, these are the five that stood out to me initially.  In the future, I hopefully will be able to put all that I’ve learned over this quarter into practice while designing professional development as it’s an area I am especially excited about.


Bishop, D, Lumpe, A., Henrikson, R, & Crane, C. (2016). Transforming Professional Learning in Washington State – Project Evaluation Report. Seattle Pacific University: Seattle, WA.

Hunter, J. (2016, June 22). Technology Starts with Professional Development and Training. Retrieved March 14, 2017, from http://www.edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2016/06/technology-starts-professional-development-and-training

ISTE Standards for Coaches. (2014). Retrieved from http://www.iste.org/standards/standards/standards-for-coaches

Office of Educational Technology. (2017). Conclusion. Retrieved March 15, 2017, from https://tech.ed.gov/netp/conclusion/

Spreading the News: New Computer Science Framework and ISTE Students Standards

Administrators at the district and school level are instrumental in the successful pursuit and implementation of educational technology initiatives. As an instructional technology specialist demonstrating and applying the ISTE Coaching Standards, it’s a responsibility to help bridge all stakeholders to create a technology rich professional learning program. Exploring ISTE Coaching Standard 4: Professional Development and […]

Designing a District Professional Learning Plan

In the DEL program course, Professional Development & Program Evaluation, we’re challenged with exploring best practices in educational technology professional development all while referencing the ISTE Coaching Standards. Coaching Standard 4: Professional Development and Program Evaluation specifically has us consider how educational technology coaches design, develop, and implement technology rich professional learning programs that model principles of […]

EDTC 6106: ISTE Coaching Standard 4b: Creating and Maintaining a Technology Rich Professional Learning Program

ISTE Coaching Standard 4 provides three benchmarks for technology coaches to conduct needs assessments, develop technology-related professional learning programs and evaluate the impact on instructional practice and student learning. My focus is on performance indicator b: Design, develop and implement technology-rich professional learning programs that model principles of adult

Finding Synergy in Professional Learning

Photo Credit:CNA Finance

ISTE Standard 4: Professional Development and Program Evaluation

Performance Indicator B

  • Design, develop, and implement technology rich professional learning programs that model principles of adult learning and promote digital age best practices in teaching, learning, and assessment.

 

For the final blog post of this quarter, our cohort explores the triggering event of: what the ideal technology rich professional learning program look like. To me, this is a question that culminates all of our learning from this quarter of exploring professional development and program evaluation. We’ve investigated adult learning, best practices within PD and how to get support and give support to all stakeholders involved, whether it be teachers, teacher leaders or administration. The question I developed branches off onto a very similar path. I was curious what characteristics make up a well rounded technology rich professional learning program. It is very similar to our triggering event, but I wanted to focus on what aspects really equally rounded out a program.

Amazingly, I struggled to find a single resources that encompassed everything I was trying to portray. At the same time, I was trying to find an angle that I hadn’t really touched on yet with my previous blog posts this quarter. I know that every characteristic I have explored has its role in producing technology rich PD, but I thought that there had to be another component I had yet to learn about.

During my search, I came across an article by Brad Adams and Dr. Sophie Winlaw titled “ Finding Synergy Between Technology-Rich Tools And Authentic Collaboration To Enable Powerful Professional Learning.” I had heard the term ‘synergy’ in the past. To me, it meant the cooperation or mix of two or more things. I thought wow, this is a great term to use when talking about adult learning and quality PD.

A lot of the article’s focus mentioned online collaboration and PD. It was also based on the platform of a group called CIRCLE (Centre for Innovation, Research, Creativity &  Leadership in Education) so a lot of the writing was tied back into the group and what tools and resources they provided. However, there were several things that stood out to me that were entirely applicable to what I was exploring.

“Global research tells us that the best professional learning for teachers is school‐based, collaborative, relational, authentic and embedded into practice. In recent years, technology has transformed professional learning, offering an array of tools to interrogate and improve practice; however these are sometimes at the expense of the crucial element of authentic and rich human collaboration” (Adams, Winlaw 2016).

The above quote sums up the important characteristics of quality professional learning, along with everything we have been learning about this quarter. Adding technology to this learning has become powerful and a way to transform learning to another level, but all of this cannot be at the expense of that element of human collaboration. PD needs to be designed and developed in a way that showcases all of these elements together working in harmony.

These components working together ensure that “professional learning is experiential for the participant, with practical outcomes for the school. In this way, the synergy of innovative technology and creative community makes for hugely productive and effective professional learning” (Adams, Winlaw 2016).

Like I mentioned, most of the article mentioned these ideas through online professional learning, but the components that stood out to me seem like they would be even more powerful in a face to face learning environment. I think that finding that synergy between technology and a rich collaborative community is really a way to create well rounded technology rich professional learning.

Resources:

Adams, B., & Winlaw, S., Dr. (2016, February 17). Finding Synergy Between Technology-Rich Tools And Authentic Collaboration To Enable Powerful Professional Learning. Retrieved March 13, 2017, from http://blog.circle.education/finding-synergy-between-technology-rich-tools-and-authentic-collaboration-to-enable-powerful-professional-learning-2

EDTC 6106: ISTE Coaching Standard 4b: “Creating a Culture and Conditions for Innovation and Change” in Professional Learning

ISTE Coaching Standard 4 provides three benchmarks for technology coaches to conduct needs assessments, develop technology-related professional learning programs and evaluate the impact on instructional practice and student learning. My focus is on performance indicator b: Design, develop and implement technology-rich professional learning programs that model principles of adult

Administrators and Professional Development

ISTE Standard 4: Professional Development and Program Evaluation

Performance Indicator B

  • Design, develop, and implement technology rich professional learning programs that model principles of adult learning and promote digital age best practices in teaching, learning, and assessment.

We have looked at professional development through the lense of an adult learner and through the perspective of a teacher leader. This week our Triggering Event lead us into professional development from an administrator’s role. We were posed this question: What role should administrators play in professional learning programs and how do we advocate for their involvement and adequate professional learning support for technology-based learning initiatives?

This was a very broad question to me. I am not sure if it is because I have never really needed to think from this perspective before, or if I genuinely did not know where to start with my own exploration. I chose to reiterate the question to keep it open enough for me to find a better focus as I dove into some resources. My related question was: In what ways can teacher leaders advocate for administrative support and involvement in quality professional learning?

Still searching for that focus, I got online and met with my cohort for our weekly Google Hangout. As part of our weekly agenda, we collaborated on a google slide regarding the characteristics of administrators who are supportive of professional learning initiatives. Still facing that mental roadblock, I did not contribute much. However, it was immensely helpful to me to see what members of my cohort contributed. They were all ideas that I knew and all things that I was familiar with. It was more obvious and powerful coming from them.

On the slide, what stuck with me the most was the idea of administrators learning with their staff. Finally I had found a jumping off point! I came across an online post, from the Center for Teaching Quality, where a blogger highlighted an administrator’s thinking of how remembering the power of seeing themselves as a teacher first and an administrator second. It states the importance of remembering to switch those “proverbial hats.” The post goes on to state that:

Instead of seeing adult learning as a place to assert authority, deliver a lecture, or offer a one-size-fits-all training, administrators should see professional development as an opportunity to promote authentic, learner-centered experiences. Professional development offers administrators a chance to re-engage with their teacher identity, and to re-frame their role as a facilitator, leader, and guide (Crowley 2015).

It then lists several ways to approach this type of thinking, all of which we have explored over the past few weeks, but are always important enough to reiterate and keep with us.

Administrators should:

  • Strive to see a roomful of learners with different needs, and differentiate
  • Learn best practice when crafting adult learning experience. Continue their own learning.
  • Get rid of the 30 page Powerpoint and consider the constructivist approach.
  • Remember that authentic learning requires authentic relationship.
  • Change the mindset. Change the learning.

I thought it was interesting this week that my initial inquiries revolved around how teacher leaders could advocate for administrative support in regards to professional development, but I ended up exploring the of the administrator and the empowerment and learning that the can create and facilitate. One of my peers reflected on this and wondered aloud about what might be more impactful, administrators advocating for support or teachers? They seem to be equally as important, and even go hand in hand. It was some good food for thought.

Resource:

Crowley, B. (2015, November 19). To Revolutionize PD, Administrators Should Follow This Simple Rule: Think Like a Teacher. Retrieved February 27, 2017, from http://www.teachingquality.org/content/blogs/brianna-crowley/revolutionize-pd-administrators-should-follow-simple-rule-think

EDTC-6106 How Can Principals Advocate for Technology Initiatives & PD?

This week we are discussing the role of administrators in professional development with a specific focus on technology. Coaching Standard 4: Professional Development and Program Evaluation: Design, develop and implement technology rich professional learning programs that model principles of adult learning and promote digital age best practices in teaching, learning, and assessment. (ISTE, 2014)

  • Triggering Event Initial Question: What role should administrators play in professional learning programs and how do we advocate for their involvement and adequate professional learning support for technology-based learning initiatives?
  • My Triggering Question: How and in what ways can principles advocate for learning support in professional development as well as technology-based learning initiatives?

From my own experience working in schools I realized that principals had to seek out and advocate for professional development and learning initiatives. However, before starting this program I paid little attention to how technology was being advocated for or shaped in my building. Through my research for this module, I have discovered that principals have a variety of ways that they can further initiatives in their building and district and it’s up to individuals to decide how and in what way they want to advocate for technology.

What and How Should Principals Advocate?

Funding

According to the article, 7 Habits of Highly Effective Tech Leading Principals, there are seven habits that principals can do to help lead tech in their building. The article has some great examples, but habit five specifically talks about advocating for funding for initiatives. (Demsky, 2012)

Often, it’s hard to find funding for technology initiatives or professional development and principals have to be creative in looking for funding or re-allocating the uses for it.  Adequate funding is an important building block for progress and once that is resolved technology leadership can be explored further.

I’ve also included a YouTube video below if you wish to know more about funding and educational technology in general.

Strategic Planning

The Department of Education talks about that there needs to be clear planning meeting the state, district, university and school levels regarding technology and how to support learning.  Principals are a part of this equation and should be a part of the conversation to help bring about change.  Conferences are a great way to get started at this broader level. (Department of Education, 2015)

Conferences

  • Attend Conferences & Training – Become a leader in the state technology associations or attend conferences to become more knowledgeable and able to advocate more effectively in their individual school, district, or state.
  • Present Sessions – Alternatively, principals can present sessions at a conference or training which will help to further their knowledge in a deeper way. (Corwin, 2011)

I believe if principals are up to date on best practices and the latest in technology development in schools, then they will be able to provide more effective professional development programs for teachers. Additionally, by advocating for the best support, integration will be that much more influential in creating change in classrooms making a lasting impact for students.


References:

Santiago. (2016, November 30). Funding Issues with Educational Technology. Retrieved March 01, 2017, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kKghgpNtyhY

Corwin. (2011). The Principal as Technology Leader. Retrieved from https://us.corwin.com/sites/default/files/upm-binaries/41065_Grady_Leading_the_Technology_Powered_School___cH1.pdf

Demsky, J. (2012, June 7). 7 Habits of Highly Effective Tech-leading Principals. Retrieved from https://thejournal.com/Articles/2012/06/07/7-habits-of-highly-effective-tech-leading-principals.aspx?Page=5

Department of Education. (2015). Leadership. Retrieved February 26, 2017, from https://tech.ed.gov/netp/leadership/

ISTE Standards for Coaches. (2014). Retrieved from http://www.iste.org/standards/standards/standards-for-coaches

EDTC 6106: ISTE Coaching Standard 4b: Digital Age Best Practices in Teacher Professional Development

ISTE Coaching Standard 4 provides three benchmarks for technology coaches to conduct needs assessments, develop technology-related professional learning programs and evaluate the impact on instructional practice and student learning. My focus is on performance indicator b: Design, develop and implement technology-rich professional learning programs that model principles of adult

Inquiry based learning and PD

ISTE Standard 4: Professional Development and Program Evaluation

Performance Indicator B

Design, develop, and implement technology rich professional learning programs that model principles of adult learning and promote digital age best practices in teaching, learning, and assessment.

This week we investigated the Triggering Event: What digital age best practices should be addressed in professional development and how should this be accomplished?

In relation to that I posed the question: In what ways can adult higher thinking and inquiry be promoted and supported within professional development?

Before I could begin to understand how inquiry based learning related to adult learning, it was important to understand what it was and the principles and factors that guide it. I found a great resource from eLearning Industry that describes teaching with an inquiry model. The infographic below highlights the most important characteristics of inquiry based learning.


How do we incorporate inquiry based learning into Professional Development?

We have all been to numerous PDs that never seem to resonate. I have been to PDs that are lectures following a powerpoint presentations or PDs that seem disjointed and disorganized with no clear relevance to me when I walk out of the door. Don’t get me wrong, I have been to several great PDs where collaboration and deeper thinking took place, but they are few and far between.

In a blog post called “The Principal of Change,” George outlines inquiry based learning and professional development. He lists the benefits of structuring PD around learning like this:

  • Experiencing a powerful learning opportunity as an adult to understand what it could look like in the classroom.  To be a master teacher, you must first be a master learner.
  • Unleashing the innovative potential of the adults in the building and creating an environment where risks are not only encouraged, but time is created to actively take them.
  • Focusing on the importance of research based on passions as an important element of learning.
  • Empowering staff in the creation of improved learning environments and giving them real opportunities to lead in the change process.

All of these benefits align with the best practices of designing and implementing quality PD. The idea that a facilitator can pose a question that drives PD and the entire learning process is powerful. He continues to paint the picture of what this could look like:

I was thinking about having an overlying question to guide other questions.  This question would be, “Why do we…?” For example, a question that could be created by a group of staff based on interests is, “Why do we have student awards?”, or “Why do we use report cards as our main assessment tool?”  Not all of the questions necessarily need to start with “why”, but it is mainly to challenge the assumptions that we have about the process of school.  

The blog post poses these ideas as a starting point, but leaves the next steps wide open. This is an idea I would like to investigate further. It would be amazing to be able to take these PD ideas to my school leadership, or design future learning that I am involved in around.

 

References:

G. (2015, April 04). Inquiry Based Professional Learning. Retrieved February 12, 2017, from http://georgecouros.ca/blog/archives/5182

Pappas, C. (2015, September 12). Instructional Design Models and Theories: Inquiry-based Learning Model. Retrieved February 12, 2017, from https://elearningindustry.com/inquiry-based-learning-model